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Irving, Texas 75063
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Hazing Facts
•   In the late 1980s, fraternities and sororities were ranked by the National Association of Insurance Commissioners as the sixth worst risk for insurance companies – just behind hazardous waste disposal companies and asbestos contractors.”  Source FIPG Manual

•    80% of college athletes have been victims of hazing;  (Alfred/NCAA survey of college athletes)  http:cnn.com/US/9908/30/sports.hazing/index.html

•    Since 1970, there has been at least one hazing-related death on a college campus each year.
•    Among high school students, close to 25 percent of students reported being hazed when joining a sports team.
•    82% of deaths from hazing involve alcohol. 
Source:National Hazing Prevention Week’s Fact Sheet

What Is Hazing?

Find Your State's Hazing Laws:  http://www.stophazing.org/laws.html

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WHAT IS HAZING?

 


For Example: The Legal Definition of Hazing in Texas
"HAZING" means any intentional, knowing, or reckless act, occurring on or off campus of an educational institution, by one person alone or acting with others, directed against a student, that endangers the mental or physical health or safety of a student for the purpose of pledging, being initiated into, affiliating with, holding office in, or maintaining membership in an organization. The term includes:
(A) any type of physical brutality, such as whipping, beating, striking, branding, electronic shocking, placing of a harmful substance on the body, or similar activity;
(B) any type of physical activity, such as sleep deprivation, exposure to the elements, confinement in a small space, calisthenics, or other activity that subjects the student to an unreasonable risk of harm or that adversely affects the mental or physical health or safety of the student;
(C) any activity involving consumption of a food, liquid, alcoholic beverage, liquor, drug, or other substance that subjects the student to an unreasonable risk of harm or that adversely affects the mental or physical health or safety of the student;
(D) any activity that intimidates or threatens the student with ostracism, that subjects the student to extreme mental stress, shame, or humiliation, that adversely affects the mental health or dignity of the student or discourages the student from entering or remaining registered in an educational institution, or that may reasonably be expected to cause a student to leave the organization or the institution rather than submit to acts described in this subdivision; and
(E) any activity that induces, causes, or requires the student to perform a duty or task that involves a violation of the Penal Code.
TEX. EDUC.CODE ANN. § 37.151(6) (Vernon 1996).



CONSENT IS NOT A DEFENSE.
It is not a defense to prosecution of an offense under this subchapter that the person against whom the hazing was directed consented to or acquiesced in the hazing activity.
TEX. EDUC. CODE ANN.37.154 (Vernon 1996)
How Do You Know If An Activity Is Hazing?



QUICK TEST:
Some activities are eaily recognized as hazing.  If you are not sure if the activity is hazing you should consult with an attorney because HAZING is a term that is defined by law.  The legal definition of "HAZING" varies from state to state.  In addition, most schools, universities, organizations and institutions have adopted definitions of HAZING that may vary somewhat, but are usually quite similar to the definition of hazing as defined by law.  Here is a common sense test that may help you determine if the conduct may have been hazing:
1.  Did this activity comply with all state laws?
2.  Did this activity comply with all school policies and rules?
3.  Did this activity add to the worth and growth of the individual?
4.  Was the activity one that the organization or individuals involved would have been willing to invite your chapter advisor to the activity?
5.  Was the activity one that the organization or individuals involved would have been willing to invite a university faculty member or administrator to this activity?
6.  Was the activity one that the organization or individuals involved would have been willing to invite your parents or the parents of the new member involved to the activity?
7.  Was the activity one that the organization or individuals involved would want to go to court to defend the merit of this activity?
8.  Is this an activity in which new members and initiated members can participate equally?
9.  Can this activity be written into a new member manual and shared with other chapters, leadership consultants, and national officers of the organization?

If you answered "NO" to any or these questions, the activity may be HAZING.